Kangaroo Island Eucalyptus Oil and Products

Emu Ridge Eucalyptus Mothers Day Special Kangaroo Island

Have you got mum a gift yet?

At Emu Ridge we are making it easy for you to find your mum the perfect gift this Mother’s Day thanks to our wide range of gift ideas online. You’re sure to find something that will make your mum smile.

Dont miss out on the SPECIAL we have on the Kangaroo Island Eucalyptus Maine Beach DUO PACK including Hand and Nail Cream 100ml and Body Mousse 150ml was $39.95 now ONLY $20.00. Order online or give us a call!

ONLY WHILE STOCKS LAST & AT THAT PRICE THEY WONT LAST LONG!

This Beautifully packaged Maine Beach range is blended with freshly picked Emu Ridge Kangaroo Island Eucalyptus leaves, crushed bush mint and a hint of spice, this extensive body care range offers an uplifting assortment of botanical oils to counter the ageing process.
Double distilled on Kangaroo Island in one of Australia’s oldest Eucalypt distilleries, the Eucalyptus oil is then infused with a floral bouquet of white rock orchid, lavender buds and ylang ylang blossom on a delicate base of vanilla pod and soft musk. The result is a sensual range of natural Australian-made products free from parabens, mineral oil, sulphate and colourant.

Gift Vouchers are always a great option to, you will find them on our online shop

We have a wide range of beautiful gift packs and boxes for sale in store and online. They are a unique Australian made gift for that special someone. We will also expertly tailor a gift to suit your  individual requirements,  full of excellent local produce. We provide customised  gift hampers as well. So if you have a special occasion for someone coming up and would like a gift basket and are not sure what to choose, we are here to help you with heaps of gift ideas. If you would like something delivered on Kangaroo Island we are happy to hand deliver your voucher or gift if it is within the Kingscote area. Otherwise we can arrange delivery for you at a small cost. All other orders are delivered by Australia Post.

 

Below are some of our favorite products, but please feel free to browse the complete online shop here.

 

#mothersday #birthday #eucalyptus #mainebeach #gift  #wildbushland #australian #present

Renewed interest in health properties of Australian Emu oil

A great story recently on ABC Landline about Emu oil.

South Australia has one emu farm and we are proud to be the label for this fantastic product. Wayne has been farming emus for over 20 years and we are proud to support this South Aussie battler, promoting, bottling and selling his Emu Oil. It truly is an amazing 100% pure natural Australian Product, which is what Emu Ridge is all about!

Emu Ridge believes in farming our natural resources in a sustainable way, promoting and selling PURE NATURAL AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTS.

This link will take you to the recent ABC Landine Story

If you missed the landline story click on the image and it will take you to it.

Im sure you will find these 2 links very interesting about Emu Oil  – Australian Emu Oil and more Interesting facts about Emu Oil

You can also purchase our 100% Pure Australian Emu Oil here.

You can purchase our 100% Pure Australian Emu Oil here.

Emu Oil has been used by the Australian aborigines for thousands of years. They have relied on its consistency of healing and therapeutic qualities to survive Australia’s harsh climate.

From the number of studies conducted it has been shown that Emu Oil really does work. It is one of nature’s finest emollients and moisturizers. It’s well known in the pharmaceutical industries, the Institute of Sport in Canberra, and is currently being used worldwide by sporting bodies.

Emu Oil is rich in Vitamins A, D,E, F & K2 and Omega 3, 6, 7 & 9 oils. It is very moisturizing and healing, it protects, nourishes and softens the skin. Emu Oil has the unique ability to penetrate the layers of skin so essential nutrients can be carried more efficiently deep beneath the surface. Emu Oil has an anti-inflammatory effect on the skin and has an anti-degenerative effect on skin cells. Emu Oil will build up a natural layer of moisture whilst opening up the pores of the skin letting your skin breathe naturally.

MOISTURISER: Emu Oil can be used on all parts of your body ie hands, arms, face, legs, hair etc. Great for sunburn or wind burn. (Apply after heat has gone.)
MASSAGE: It is a great carrier oil for mixing with other oils.
ARTHRITIS, INFLAMMATION, ACHING MUSCLES: It will penetrate deeply and work to cut down inflammation, open up blood capillaries and promote increased blood flow and oxygen to problem areas. This is essential for the healing of muscle and joint problems. (Mix half Emu Oil and half Eucalyptus oil for an excellent liniment.) People have also had allot of success taking it orally as well 1 or 2 teaspoon a day. this may also help gut issues, see the above links.

ECZEMA, DERMATITIS AND PSORIASIS: It will significantly reduce irritation and inflammation of the skin.
BITES: Relieves and soothes irritated skin and insect bites. (Also works well adding some Eucalyptus Oil to the Emu Oil.)
BURNS AND CUTS: It promotes faster healing to these areas with reduced pain and scarring. ( Hospitals are using it these days for burn victims)

Emu Oil is extremely low-allergenic therefore ideal for sensitive skin. It produces no known side effects and in its natural state, doesn’t support any bacterial organisms.

OUTBACK SCENE: Wayne Piltz, Southern Emu, Moorook, with some of the emus on-farm.

 OUTBACK SCENE: Wayne Piltz, Southern Emu, Moorook, with some of the emus on-farm.

Southern Emu director Wayne Piltz, Moorok, who farms emus with son Darryn, has been in the emu industry for more than two decades and said it has been through some tumultuous times.

“I was involved in the initial build-up in the early to mid 1990s,” he said. “At that stage there were more than 100 farms. I found out last year that I’m the only licensed emu farm left in SA.”

They have 600 birds on the property, with about 28 hectares fenced into emu pens.

“This year we might hatch 600 chicks if we know we have the markets for them,” he said.

He has selected breeders, which can each produce up to eight eggs at a time.

Emus build up fat supplies in spring and summer ahead of their breeding season from March to June.

* * * * * * * * * *

If your interested in Emu Eggs and Emu Products see this link.

Emu farming helps to protect our environment. The Emu is native to Australia and can live in harmony with our land, thus reducing the chemical dependence and land clearance needed for introduced species. The Emu is the largest of all Australian birds, it cannot fly, and can run at speeds of 48 kms per hour.

Since 1991 we have believed that farming our natural resources in a sustainable way is our greatest asset. Eucalyptus is but one of the things that grows naturally on our property. The government is making it very hard for us to farm this way on Kangaroo Island! Our Wallabies and Kangaroo’s are culled (shot ) and left to rot in the ground. They revoked our Emu Farming licence and we are now only permitted to sell emu eggs for both edible and hollow eggs sales, not for meat and leather. We will continue to fight these regulations. Farming our natural resources is far better for the environment. We used to be sheep farmers way back in another life!
I hope you enjoyed this story ~Bev~

Kapunda Farm Fair 2018 – Kangaroo Island Produce from Emu Ridge Eucalyptus & Rustic Blue Gallery

 

KAPUNDA FARM FAIR 2018

( Update we really enjoyed our time at the Fair it was very successful and thank Mr Bill Adams for pestering us at the YP Field Days for the last 6 years! His hard work finally paid off, and what a trooper he is)

Emu Ridge Eucalyptus and Rustic Blue Gallery from Kangaroo Island are very pleased to be offering their produce for the very first time at the Kapunda Farm Fair.

Emu Ridge will have their Eucalyptus oil and associated natural products as well as the very talked about South Australian Emu oil and some great Specials on the day. Emu ridge is the only commercial Eucalyptus oil distillery in South Australia.

Rustic Blue will have a range of Kangaroo Island Merino wool and possum fur clothing and accessories and locally made jewellery, bags and affordable Australian gift ware.

We look forward to the locals in that area supporting us and look forward to meeting everyone.

The 11th Kapunda Farm Fair will be held at the Kapunda Harness Racing Complex on Friday the 13th and Saturday the 14th of  April 2018.

Admission charges also remain at $10 as they have for many years, it is noted some field days charge $16 with no concessions applying. Attracting more crowd numbers is our aim.

Since our successful 2016 event, crops have been excellent with good rains.
The Kapunda township, with history galore, is on the brink of expansion to a degree not seen before. A new supermarket to be built soon, J.T.Johnson and Sons have spent millions on a new pellet mill, and the Kapunda Bowling Club has relocated to an undercover facility (10 synthetic rinks) at Dutton Park, just to name a few. Millions of dollars of developments have created many new jobs in construction and on completion.

We anticipate being able to expand our machinery displays and are reaching out to every state to bring new exhibitors and interest to our growing event. We are blessed with a level and easily accessible site with ample, close, and free parking for our patrons. Fine weather will ensure another good result for all concerned.

A message we are keen to promote is that this is much more than a Farm Fair, it has something for Dad and Mum and the children of all ages. Entertainment is in the process of being finalized and will be more than as in the past. Given good weather, the 2016 crowd of 7,000 will be surpassed.

Kangaroo Island Eucalyptus Maine Beach Wild Bushland Duo Pack SPECIAL

Dont miss this SPECIAL on the Kangaroo Island Eucalyptus Maine Beach DUO PACK including Hand and Nail Cream 100ml and Body Mousse 150ml was $39.95 now ONLY $20.00. Order online or give us a call!

ONLY WHILE STOCKS LAST!

This Beautifully packaged Maine Beach range is blended with freshly picked Emu Ridge Kangaroo Island Eucalyptus leaves, crushed bush mint and a hint of spice, this extensive body care range offers an uplifting assortment of botanical oils to counter the ageing process.
Double distilled on Kangaroo Island in one of Australia’s oldest Eucalypt distilleries, the Eucalyptus oil is then infused with a floral bouquet of white rock orchid, lavender buds and ylang ylang blossom on a delicate base of vanilla pod and soft musk. The result is a sensual range of natural Australian-made products free from parabens, mineral oil, sulphate and colourant.

#mothersday #birthday #eucalyptus #mainebeach #gift  #wildbushland

Easter Opening hours at Emu Ridge

Larry, Bev and the  Emu Ridge team hope everyone has a lovely Easter Break. We are going to be open for everyone everyday 9am – 3pm.

Enjoy our Eucalyptus and Natural Products, Local Produce, Kangaroo Island Cider Tasting and Sales and the Cafe.

This lovely Easter Bilby artpiece painted by our volunteer Laura Hepworth, an artist from the UK. If your not sure what a Bilby is see below. We are all about Australian Natives so we are using our Native Bilby for our Easter wishes.

Bilby (Macrotis lagotis)

The Australian Easter Bilby
Bilbies, or rabbit-bandicoots, are desert-dwelling marsupial omnivores; they are members of the order Peramelemorphia. At the time of European colonisation of Australia, there were two species. The lesser bilby became extinct in the 1950s; the greater bilby survives but remains endangered. It is currently listed as a vulnerable species. It is on average 55 cm (22 in) long, excluding the tail, which is usually around 29 cm (11 in) long. Its fur is usually grey or white, it has a long pointy nose and very long ears, hence earning its nick-name, the rabbit-eared bandicoot. Bilbies Burrow for Safety!

Greater Bilby on ground near its burrow

Greater Bilby in captivity. Photo: Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage.

The Bilby is an important part of traditional indigenous culture in the deserts of Central Australia. The large rabbit like ears of the Greater Bilby (referred to as Bilby) have also made it a popular Australian icon at Easter. Sadly, through habitat loss and competition with introduced animals, the number of these small mammals has dramatically reduced over the last 100 years.

As members of a group of ground-dwelling marsupials known as Bandicoots, Bilbies have long pointed snouts and compact bodies. Bilbies measure between 29 and 55cm in length and differ from other Bandicoots by their larger ears, long silky fur and longer tails.

Bilbies are remarkable burrowers, using their strong forelimbs and claws to build extensive tunnels. One Bilby may make up to twelve burrows within its home range to use for shelter. They have long slender tongues that they use to eat a specialised diet of seeds, insects, bulbs, fruit and fungi. Bilbies are active at night, sheltering in their burrows during the daytime.

Where is it found?

A hundred years ago, Bilbies were common in many habitats throughout Australia, from the dry interior to temperate coastal regions. Changes to the Bilby’s habitat have seen their numbers greatly reduced and today the species is nationally listed as vulnerable. They now occur in fragmented populations in mulga shrublands and spinifex grasslands in the Tanami Desert of the Northern Territory; in the Gibson and Great Sandy Deserts and the Pilbara and Kimberley regions of Western Australia; and the Mitchell Grasslands of southwest Queensland.

What are the threats?

While there are many threats contributing to the dramatic decline of Bilby populations, the most important of these are habitat loss and change, and competition with introduced animals. As agricultural activities extended over the more fertile regions of Australia the Bilby’s habitat has changed rapidly. Changing fire patterns also affect the type and abundance of food plants.

Competition with introduced animals is a major threat as domestic stock like cattle and sheep eat the same plants. Rabbits compete with Bilbies for their food and burrows and foxes and feral cats also prey on them.

Having disappeared from the areas intensively grazed by livestock as well as those areas densely populated by Rabbits, Cats and Foxes, Bilbies now only survive in small isolated populations in the driest and least fertile regions of arid Australia.

What is happening?

The Bilby is protected throughout Australia where it occurs. A national Recovery Plan is being developed to ensure the survival of the Bilby. Key recovery actions include:

  • managing the Bilby’s remaining habitat;
  • breeding in captivity;
  • monitoring existing populations; and
  • re-establishing Bilbies in areas where they previously occurred.

The ‘Save the Bilby’ project, based in the Queensland town of Charleville, is an example of a few determined individuals making a big difference. The local team aims to build a predator-proof enclosure surrounding part of a national park to reintroduce Bilbies into far western Queensland. They have raised money for their project by running “meet the Bilby” evenings, with a talk, video and meeting of the captive Bilby breeding colony, and by selling Bilby merchandise in shopping centres across southern Queensland.

Source environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/bilby-macrotis-lagotis

Sustainable Emu Farming – Working together supporting SA

We are proud to be associated with Wayne from Southern Emu and Andrew Fielke from Tuckeroo.  We have had a long association with Andrew and his Australian Native Produce. Andrew has developed a great new range of Emu Meat products that are available at Emu Ridge on Kangaroo Island. Wayne has been farming emus for over 20 years and we are proud to support this South Aussie battler, promoting, bottling and selling his Emu Oil. It truly is an amazing 100% pure natural Australian Product, which is what Emu Ridge is all about!

Emu Ridge believes in farming our natural resources in a sustainable way, promoting and selling PURE NATURAL AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTS.

You may find these 2 links interesting about Emu Oil  – Australian Emu Oil and more Interesting facts about Emu Oil

You can also purchase our Emu Oil here.

 You can purchase our Emu Oil here.
OUTBACK SCENE: Wayne Piltz, Southern Emu, Moorook, with some of the emus on-farm.

 OUTBACK SCENE: Wayne Piltz, Southern Emu, Moorook, with some of the emus on-farm.

Australian emu meat is making its way to more plates, after a partnership between a producer and a chef translated to more retail opportunities.

Southern Emu director Wayne Piltz, Moorok, who farms emus with son Darryn, has been in the emu industry for more than two decades and said it has been through some tumultuous times.

“I was involved in the initial build-up in the early to mid 1990s,” he said. “At that stage there were more than 100 farms. I found out last year that I’m the only licensed emu farm left in SA.”

In the past year, Wayne has teamed up with chef and native food enthusiast Andrew Fielke to supply emu meat for his Tuckeroo food brand.

While Wayne is celebrating the news of the meat partnership, he said the primary income in emus remains from oil.

“A kilogram of emu fat is worth three or four times a kilogram of meat,” he said.

The birds are killed at an abattoir at Wycheproof, Vic, which is about about an 800-kilometre round-trip, but is the closest facility available.

Wayne sells half the fat to the abattoir with the other half rendered into emu oil, with the majority of the Southern Emus oil sold to the Emu Ridge Eucalyptus Oil Distillery on Kangaroo Island.

At one stage, the farm ran up to 2000 birds, but this year Wayne said they killed about 330, with all meat going to Tuckeroo.

They have 600 birds on the property, with about 28 hectares fenced into emu pens.

“This year we might hatch 600 chicks if we know we have the markets for them,” he said.

He has selected breeders, which can each produce up to eight eggs at a time.

Emus build up fat supplies in spring and summer ahead of their breeding season from March to June.

They are fed grain, hay, protein additives, vitamin additives and even used cooking oil to help build fat levels.

Wayne said the optimum slaughter time was before the breeding season, at about 18 to 20 months old. He aims to produce about 8.5kg to 9kg of fat per bird, with fat worth between $25/kg to $35/kg.

He said meat returns essentially covered the cost of slaughter.

 TASTE TEST: Tuckeroo’s Andrew Fielke and Southern Emu’s Wayne Piltz with emu pate at the Murray River and Lands on your table stall in the Adelaide Central Markets.

Innovative restaurants create growing demand for native produce

Consulting chef and owner of food supplier Tuckeroo Gourmet Retail Andrew Fielke says the next big trend in local cuisine is native foods.

“I’ve been a native food distributor since 2001, and in the past two years we’ve had phenomenal growth and interest in the sector,” he said.

Mr Fielke has teamed up with Riverland operation Southern Emu to produce a range of emu meat products.

He has worked with emu on and off through the years but liked the idea of sourcing a supply from an SA business.

“As a Riverland boy, I’m passionate about supporting local producers,” he said.

The range of emu products includes pate, pies, kabana and sausages, while his next project is a smoked emu in a proscuitto-style.

He wants to retail these in gourmet shops, while some will also be available in selected Riverland outlets, such as Flavours of the Riverland, as well as at the Riverland Markets.

Mr Fielke said the move towards native foods was started by leading international restaurateur Rene Redzepi at noma in Copenhagen, who set the trend for using food sourced from the local regions.

This has been taken up by high-end Australian restaurants, using native Australian produce.

“This trend then filters down to gourmet shops, hotels and restaurants throughout Australia,” he said.

Mr Fielke also supplies the emu kabana and pate to camping tour companies out of Alice Springs, NT, and Darwin.

“It allows international tourists to enjoy outback Australia with a native food inspired meal,” he said.

Since 1991 we have believed that farming our natural resources in a sustainable way is our greatest asset. Eucalyptus is but one of the things that grows naturally on our property. The government is making it very hard for us to farm this way on Kangaroo Island! Our Wallabies and Kangaroo’s are culled (shot ) and left to rot in the ground. They revoked our Emu Farming licence and we are now only permitted to sell emu eggs for both edible and hollow eggs sales, not for meat and leather. We will continue to fight these regulations. Farming our natural resources is far better for the environment. We used to be sheep farmers way back in another life!
I hope you enjoyed this story ~Bev~
Source – some of this Story was in the Stock Journal written by  Elizabeth Anderson News

Iconic Australian has its own Day, National Eucalypts Day

Eucalypts: Some things you may not know about an iconic Australian

Eucalypt Day is an initiative by Eucalypt Australia to continue in its quest to raise awareness of eucalypts and celebrate the important place that they hold in the hearts and lives of Australians. Eucalypts even have their own national day — on March 23.

DID YOU KNOW

You’d be hard pressed to go more than 10 minutes without spotting a eucalyptus tree in Australia.

They dominate our landscapes from the bush to our backyards, paddocks, parks and pavements.

They are extraordinary plants and many people love them.

One of those people is botanist Pauline Ladiges.

The world expert has been studying this iconic group of plants for the past 55 years.

“The most interesting thing for me is the diversity of the whole eucalypt group and its extraordinarily ancient history,” said Professor Ladiges from the University of Melbourne.

So how much do you know about this iconic plant? Let’s take a closer look.

What’s in a name?

The term eucalypt — meaning well (eu) covered (kalyptos) — was first coined by French botanist Charles Louis L’Héritiert de Brutelle in 1788.

 

Info on our unique Kangaroo Island Eucalyptus tree Kangaroo Island narrow leaf mallee Eucalyptus cneorifolia  

You can find our unique Eucalyptus oil for sale here

The ancient fossil link to Gondwana

The roots of the eucalypt go back to when Australia was part of the supercontinent Gondwana.

The oldest known examples of eucalypt fossils are 52 million-year-old flowers, fruits and leaves found in Patagonia.

“There are some superb fossils that I don’t think anyone doubts that have been described from South America,” said Professor Ladiges.

“The eucalypt group has to go back beyond that [age] because the fossils are so recognisable.

“They just look like fruits off a tree down the road.”

Sequencing of the eucalypt genome from the rose gum (Eucalypt grandis) — a species found in coastal areas of New South Wales and Queensland — indicates the group goes back at least 109 million years.

At that time, flowering trees were starting to take off and dinosaurs roamed the land.

A diverse Australasian

Today, botanists have identified around 900 species of eucalypts divided into three different groups: Eucalyptus, which make up the bulk of the species; Corymbia, the bloodwood eucalypts mainly found in the north; and Angophora.

Eucalypts come in all shapes and sizes and dominate the landscape from alpine regions to the outback and edges of rainforests.

There’s the mighty mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans), the world’s tallest flowering tree; the gnarly snow gum (Eucalyptus pauciflora); the multi-stemmed bull mallee (Eucalyptus behriana); the apple or cabbage ghost gum (Corymbia flavescens) found in northern Australia; and the twisted Sydney red gum (Angophora costata).

“The only place they don’t really dominate is the very, very arid parts of Australia,” Professor Ladiges said.

But while we think of eucalypts as being uniquely Australian, there are also a handful of species in New Guinea, Timor, Sulewesi and even one species — the rainbow gum (Eucalyptus deglupta) — on the Philippine island of Mindanao.

Bark up the right tree

One of the most distinctive features of eucalypts is their bark.

Some trees have smooth bark — as the tree grows it sheds old layers from its trunk or branches. The new bark underneath is often brightly coloured that fades over time.

There are also half-barked trees that have thick bark around their trunk but smooth limbs.

“In some areas where a fire might be more like a grass fire, a lower storey fire, you’ll find trees there that only have rough bark at the base,” Professor Ladiges said.

Other trees are completely covered in rough bark. The old layer of bark stays attached to the tree and forms a thick protective layer against fire. Rough barks can be a bit trickier to identify because the texture can take different forms.

If the bark has long stringy bark, it might a stringybark, if it has tough, blackened furrowed bark it might be an ironbark, and if it has really short fibres it might be a box or a peppermint.

But beware: not all trees with stringy bark are actually stringybarks, said Professor Ladiges.

There are about 30 species in eastern Australia that can be classified as stringybarks, but she said the word gets used for similar species that are not closely related.

The Darwin stringybark (Eucalyptus tetradonta) used in Aboriginal bark paintings in the Northern Territory is one of these false stringybarks.

Indigenous people across Australia also use bark to make canoes and shields.

In New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland there are a number of protected scarred trees. As the name suggests these trees bear scars from where the bark was cut away and sometimes engraved.

There’s oil and gold in them thar leaves

A eucalypt’s leaves are packed with oil glands that produce the aromatic compounds that give us their distinctive scent.

“Some smell very strongly eucalyptus-like, some smell really like peppermints, and the lemon-scented gum has a more lemony smell,” Professor Ladiges said.

These compounds help protect the tree from attack by pests.

“Oil glands make them unpalatable to insects, but then you get insects that adapt to eating those sorts of leaves,” she said.

In 2013, biologists discovered that a yellowbox tree (Eucalyptus mellidora) in sheep paddock in New South Wales could change the smell of its leaves from one side to the other to protect itself against attack.

Scientists also discovered the leaves of trees in Kimberley contain microscopic traces of gold, using sophisticated imaging techniques.

Eucalypt leaves also change over a tree’s lifetime.

The leaves of a young sapling are held horizontally to maximise the surface area for gathering light. As the tree ages, the stalk of the leaf twists so that the leaf becomes vertical and is not exposed to as much radiation.

But it’s not just the shape that changes, the structure changes, Professor Ladiges said.

“The anatomy inside changes. Instead of having an upper and lower surface both sides will have photosynthetic tissue,” she said.

This enables the leaves to maximise photosynthesis and minimise exposure to heat.

“They also have a lot of thick-walled cells, a lot of fibres. So they are really, really tough.”

They’re fruits not nuts

May Gibbs is a favorite author of mine, her Gum nut babies were ahead of their time soo cute!

It doesn’t have the same ring to it, but Snugglepot and Cuddlepie are technically gum-fruit babies.

“People call them gumnuts but they’re actually capsules which means that they open by valves at the top of the fruit. These valves dry up and open up and seeds drop out,” Professor Ladiges said.

These hard, woody capsules have a thick wall, which is not destroyed by heat. The capsules open up after fire to release the undamaged seeds.

Professor Ladiges said the shape and number of these capsules is distinctive from species to species.

Reading the fire risk of the country

Features such as oil-filled leaves and bark that can easily shed make eucalypts highly flammable.

This ability to stoke a fire is part of their survival strategy, said Professor Ladiges.

“If a fire is hot but goes through fast it will do less damage than a really slow burning fire.”

“The fact that that helps fire go through fast was clearly a selective advantage to the species because then their seeds wouldn’t have been cooked.”

Even if the tops of the trees are destroyed by fire, many species can re-sprout from buds under their bark or from a lignotuber at the base of the tree. But not all species can re-sprout.

A handful of species only regenerate from seed, which makes them very vulnerable to frequent, high intensity fires.

These species include the mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) and alpine ash (Eucalyptus delegatensis) in the Australian alps, and a group of species such as the salmon eucalypt (E. salmonophloia) in Western Australia’s wheatbelt.

 

 

 

By gum, it’s kino

Many species of eucalypts ooze thick, red resin known as kino.

Recent research based on two Queensland species, the lemon-scented gum (Corymbia citriodora) and cadaghi gum (Eucalyptus torelliana), has shown eucalypt resin has antibacterial properties.

Resin has been traditionally used by Indigenous Australians to treat cuts and wounds.

While the most famous eucalypt-muncher is the koala, kino is an important food source for the yellow-bellied glider (Petaurus australis), a small tree-dweller that lives in the forests of eastern Australia.

 

Summer and winter

Eucalypt flowers have evolved to attract specific pollinators.

Most eucalypts flower in summer, Professor Ladiges said.

“If you went down the coast now in Victoria you’d have messmate (Eucalyptus obliqua) and manna gums (Eucalyptus viminalis) flowering. And they’re basically pollinated by insects,” she said.

While these species of eucalypts have pale coloured flowers, others such as the Darwin woollybutt (Eucalyptus miniata) and the large-fruited mallee (Eucalyptus youngiana) are more brightly coloured.

These species flower in winter and are pollinated by birds.

“The colour is the stamens — the male part of the flower.”

The flowering cycle also differs between species, with some flowering longer than others.

Some alpine ash eucalypts in the Australian alps are also starting to flower early in response to recurrent fires, Dr Bowman said.

What’s that eucalypt?

There are so many different species the best way to identify different species is to get a field guide for the local area, Professor Ladiges said.

While it may not help you put a name to the plant sitting on the verge outside your house, it will help if you go bush.

“Once people start getting their eye in for the bark, the fruit and the juvenile leaves they’re well on their way to identifying a plant.”

So go out bush and get closer to this iconic — and extraordinarily ancient — Australian.

 

some info By Genelle Weule  Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-01-26/eucalyptus-trees-an-iconic-australian/9330782

Eucalyptus Oil Is Good For Your Health – Learn How

We sometimes forget that a lot of people don’t know the amazing uses of our Emu Ridge Eucalyptus Oil. Here is a few amazing benefits for Health, Skin and Hair.

Why is Emu Ridge Eucalyptus Oil Good for Health?

The following list will give you an idea about extensive medicinal benefits of eucalyptus oil:

1. Eucalyptus oil is a vasodilator by nature. Hence, massaging the body with it regularly will help you improve blood circulation throughout the body.

2. The aromatic oil is a blessing for diabetic patients as it can keep their blood sugar under control efficiently.

3. When it comes to getting rid of the intolerable pain of kidney stones, eucalyptus oil is considered as one of the best solutions. Massaging the lower abdominal area with it will give you almost instant relief.

4. The anti-bacterial property of eucalyptus oil makes it a true remedy for all types of infections. It is also an amazing anti-inflammatory agent that can fight against issues like diarrhea, ear inflammation, and so on.

5. Eucalyptus oil is known to be highly effective in treating lung infections. You need to massage your chest with it in order to keep your respiratory organs, such as nasal cavity, lungs, etc. clear from congestion.

6. Inhaling eucalyptus oil or getting a chest massage with it slowly is helpful in curing asthma.

7. The fragrant oil is also capable of providing instant relief in bronchitis and other related symptoms.

8. It has also been found that eucalyptus oil can heal regular cold and cough.

Eucalyptus Oil Massage

9. You can easily get rid of muscle fatigue and muscle sore by channeling the lactic acid all the way through the lymphatic system and it can be done effectively with the eucalyptus oil massage.

10. The scented oil has great effects on measles. You can either massage the reflex points of your feet with it or spread it throughout the home.

11. Eucalyptus oil can cool down our body and keep us away from ailments like heat strokes, sun strokes, etc. during the scorching heat of summer.

12. If bad breath makes you embarrassed, just add a few drops of eucalyptus oil to your mouthwash and see the difference!

Why is Eucalyptus Oil Good for Skin?

Important skin benefits of eucalyptus oil are listed below:

13. Mix a few drops of eucalyptus oil with sweet almond oil or pure coconut oil and massage your skin with it. It will rejuvenate your skin and make it softer.

14. Due to its antiseptic properties, eucalyptus oil can be used for treating minor cuts, wounds, blisters, bumps, boils, insect bites, and other similar skin problems.

15. Eucalyptus oil is considered as an indispensable part of aromatherapy. You can combine it with bath salt or whole milk and inhale the aroma through steam so that your skin can absorb it easily and turns naturally beautiful.

Why is Eucalyptus Oil Good for Hair?
Apart from skin, eucalyptus oil can also benefit our hair in the following ways:

16. A mixture of this essential oil and olive oil can stimulate our hair follicles and boost the flow of blood throughout our scalp. Consequently, we get long and strong hair.

17. You can blend eucalyptus oil with vinegar and massage your scalp with this mixture in order to get rid of dryness and itchiness.

18. The vapor of eucalyptus oil has long been used for killing head lice and spoiling their eggs.

19. Regular application of eucalyptus oil can help you avoid scalp infection by preventing the clogging of skin pores.

20. The amazing essential oil can improve the overall health of our hair by making it longer, thicker and glossier

Also check out this link re Emu Ridge Emu Oil for your scalp and hair

We found this info here  http://bit.ly/Ul3AG2

Emu Ridge Shop

Mel from Mels Balance Beauty & Massage on Kangaroo Island we highly recommend her http://melsbbandm.com.au/beautyandmassage/

 

Celebrate St Patricks Day at Emu Ridge on Kangaroo Island

If your going to be on Kangaroo Island on March the 17th come and Celebrate St Patrick’s Day Emu Ridge!

We are looking forward to entertaining you on St Patrick’s day. We are so sorry to inconvenience anyone re our evening event, It has unfortunately been cancelled. We will still be serving our St Pats inspired Menu all day !

 

Children friendly.

St Patrick’s Day Menu

St Patrick’s Day Menu pdf

$30 per head for 3 courses including a complimentary tea and coffee

Entrée: Pot of Gold Soup (Creamy roast garlic, broccoli & vintage cheddar, with gold flaked pepper) $8

Main: Deconstructed Guinness Beef Pie with St. Patrick’s Colcannon Potatoes and pea, mint & feta salad. $16

Vegetarian: Spinach, mushroom and feta Quiche

Dessert: Bailey’s ice cream Cheese Cake/Gluten Free available  $8

gluten free &/or vegetarian options available on pre-booking requests.

Our everyday and St Patrick inspired Menu is available and till 5.oopm. 

St Patrick’s Day Drinks available all day including:

Irish Illusion

Baileys on Ice

Local Wines

Kangaroo Island Ciders

Local Drunken Drone Beer

Beer Hahn Super Dry Beer

Coopers Beer

Soft drink/Water

St Patrick’s Day is an annual observance that is popular in Australia on March 17. … Many Australians come together on St Patrick’s Day to celebrate Irish culture and remember St Patrick’s life and achievements. Find out more about the history behind St Patrick’s Day

Stay up to date with the event on our Facebook page or on our Facebook event

BiZ Better Together 2017

Hi I was very lucky to win a ticket to this empowering conference. Was so interesting and inspiring. Thanks Bank SA

I had an amazing day today at the Mobile-ising Women in Business Conference. A big thanks to BankSA for chosing me to win a ticket to this empowering event at the National Wine Centre. So many amazing speakers! Some of my favorites, Sarah Vaughan Microsoft, Amy Prosser Brightcove, and Dr Fiona Kerr, talking about our brain, what an amazing woman she is! Belinda Heggen The Press Gallery was an awesome MC and I was also lucky enough to win $1000 training of my choice by the Australian Institute of Company Directors thanks so much to all Business SAWomen Mean BusinessAustralian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and Biz Better Together it was truly inspiring! Lets hope I can put some things to good use! And I hope everyone knows they can buy some great Aussie products #online at #Emuridge on #Kangarooisland

 

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