Mr Graham Lloyd of Penneshaw will be sadly missed.

Mr Lloyd
(THIS DELICIOUS PRODUCT HAS NOW SOLD OUT) We do have some frozen berries that he had picked and will endeavour to make some soon
Mr Graham Lloyd of Penneshaw recently passed away suddenly. He was a lovely man, a true gentleman who will be sadly missed. He did allot for the Penneshaw community, some of which you can read below, but I would like to tell you what he has done for us over the years.
He made our native currant or wild berry jams & sauces for over 28 years. He loved wandering around the bush, picking the wild native currants when they were fruiting. His wife Kath was the one who began the tradition as the berries once grew in abundance around Penneshaw. As time went by he took over and she didn’t really know where he picked them from or his recipe that he refined over the years.
So what we have remaining is very special and precious indeed to us all. 
Over the years Graham made his very own machine for cleaning the prickly leaves from the berries there was also a knack in harvesting as well! 
All we have left are the 300gm jars that sell for $10.50. This delicious Wild Berry Conserve can be used not only on toast and scones but with cold meats, as a glaze on meats or with soft cheeses such as Camembert, prefect on a platter. (THIS DELICIOUS PRODUCT HAS NOW SOLD OUT) We do have some frozen berries that he had picked and will endeavour to make some soon(THIS DELICIOUS PRODUCT HAS NOW SOLD OUT) We do have some frozen berries that he had picked and will endeavour to make some soon

Kangaroo Island Wild Berry or Acrotriche depressa or common name Native Currant

Native Currants (Acrotriche depressa) are indigenous to Southern South Australia and Kangaroo Island and are a low growing heath found in well drained sheltered areas.

The little berries were a favourite food of the Aboriginal people. Its a low bushy shrub growing about 80cm high with rigid pointed leaves and spikes or pale green flowers hidden under the branches during October to December. The bush favors mallee scrub and is found on Kangaroo island and parts of SA, WA & Vic. The berries are about the size of a pea. It has a strong tangy/acidic flavor.

The burgundy coloured native berry is very useful as a base for savoury and sweet sauces and desserts. The juice of the berry can be extracted using a food processor (on low) and then pouring through a sieve to separate from the seed.

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Mr Lloyd also enjoyed wood turning, he also turned these lovely wooden oil diffuser pots for us, each pot is individually turned and then decorated by the Emu Ridge staff.

They act as little diffusers for your home. Simply put a few drops of your chosen oil inside the pot and wait for the fragrance to linger thoughout your home,  wardrobe, draws or your car. Not many of these left either! You can purchase them here.

Wood Pots

Graham Lloyd was the creator of the Wallaby track at Penneshaw

 Wallaby Track creator Graham Lloyd at the sign at the start of the Wallaby track on the eastern end of Penneshaw. Photo Shane Sanigar
It’s a 3 km return hike which follows a natural spring fed creek bed with naturally occurring waterfalls into limestone features. A must see and do in Winter!
This little hike was built by Graham Lloyd in honour of the Trethewey family. You can access the Wallaby Track walking trail from Binny’s Track just down the road from Frenchman’s Rock in Penneshaw. It’s a fantastic outing for kids and adults alike, however this one is a little more challenging, so wear good sturdy walking shoes.

Penneshaw rallies behind Wallaby Track builder Graham Lloyd after vandalism

Penneshaw is rallying behind the creator of the Wallaby Track after ongoing and disheartening instances of vandalism.

Retired builder Graham Lloyd built and maintains the trail on his nephew’s David “Duffy” Trewthewey’s land on the eastern side of town.

In recent weeks there have been ongoing instances of vandalism to some of the structures, as well as the small plastic ducks, frogs and birds he places on the trail, many motion activated to croak or chirp.

“It’s a shame because most people really enjoy the track, especially children,” he said. “There’s three wonderful waterfalls in the first kilometre when there’s been enough rain.”

Kids love the waterfalls and creatures along the Wallaby Track at Penneshaw. Photo GoFundMe page

 Kids love the waterfalls and creatures along the Wallaby Track at Penneshaw. Photo GoFundMe page

Now the community has set up a GoFundMe page Wallaby Track Walking Trail, which raised $500 in its first 24 hours.

“I am calling on you to donate anything you can to help Graham continue his great work and to repair the damaged attractions,” page originator Clayton Willson wrote.

Mr Willson has also pledged to run the full 2021 Kangaroo Island Marathon to help with the fundraising effort.

Penneshaw local Shane Sanigar is among the locals who enjoy taking their kids down the trail and is equally disappointed to see the vandalism.

It is hoped the money raised will help with track maintenance and lift the spirits of Mr Lloyd, he said.

The sign at the Wallaby Track at Penneshaw explains its history and marks out its attractions. Photo Shane Sanigar

 The sign at the Wallaby Track at Penneshaw explains its history and marks out its attractions. Photo Shane Sanigar

He dedicated the 1.5km track along Pork Creek to the Trethewey family. He is connection to the family goes back when his eldest sister Fen married Vern Trethewey.

About eight years ago, he was walking along the creek after a decent rain and noticed all the water and waterfalls, thinking it would be a great tourist attraction.

It took him about two months to work out the exact route and over the years he’s built eight wooden bridges, one wooden staircase, 80 cement steps and one dam wall.

His nephew Duffy donated all the sand for the concrete works, which make the track safer to walk.

The Penneshaw Progress Association has secured two grants to plant 300 trees and shrubs along the track, a project about half complete.

One of the Island’s many best-kept secrets, the Wallaby Track in recent years has perhaps been outshone by the recently opened Kangaroo Island Scultpure Trail, located in just the next gully.

Story from Islander Newspapers also See: Kangaroo Island sculpture trail taking shape at Penneshaw